Stanford Mechanics and Computation
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==Focus Areas==
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===Computational mechanics===
 
===Computational mechanics===
  
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''Micro­scale devices'' are micro­machined sensors for system monitoring and modeling and are also used for measuring nanoscale mechanical behavior. In the Mechanics and Computation Group we have a special interest in the biomedical applications of nanofabricated devices with the goal of developing diagnostic tools, measurement and analysis systems, and reliable manufacture methods. Active projects include piezoresistive MEMS underwater shear stress sensor, piezoresistive processing, cell stimulation and force measurements, understanding the biological sense of touch, and coaxial tip piezoresistive probes for scanning gate microscopy.
 
''Micro­scale devices'' are micro­machined sensors for system monitoring and modeling and are also used for measuring nanoscale mechanical behavior. In the Mechanics and Computation Group we have a special interest in the biomedical applications of nanofabricated devices with the goal of developing diagnostic tools, measurement and analysis systems, and reliable manufacture methods. Active projects include piezoresistive MEMS underwater shear stress sensor, piezoresistive processing, cell stimulation and force measurements, understanding the biological sense of touch, and coaxial tip piezoresistive probes for scanning gate microscopy.
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==Facilities==
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===Computing===
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The Mechanics and Computation Group has a Computational Mechanics Laboratory that provides an integrated computational environment for research and research-related education in computational mechanics and scientific computing. The laboratory houses Silicon Graphics, Sun, and HP workstations and servers, including an 8-processor SGI Origin2000 and a 16-processor networked cluster of Intel-architecture workstations for parallel and distributed computing solutions of computationally intensive problems. Software is available on the laboratory machines, including commercial packages for engineering analysis, parametric geometry and meshing, and computational mathematics. The laboratory supports basic research in computational mechanics as well as the development of related applications such as simulation-based design technology.
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Specific details can be found at [http://hpcc.stanford.edu/ hpcc.stanford.edu] and [http://hpcc.stanford.edu/clusters/mc-cc.html here].

Revision as of 20:07, 24 September 2007